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WELLNESS

Do These 5 Things Before Looking At Your Phone In The Morning

woman looking at phone in bed

Photo by Ketut Subiyanto 

Do you reach for your phone first thing in the morning?

Is this something you want to do? Or is it a habit that is so ingrained that you don't even think about it anymore?

If it is a habit, is it one that you want to keep or change? If you are perfectly happy with it, you don't have to read the rest of this blog post.

But if you have been wanting to change and not feel so tethered to your electronics that you reach for one even before you are fully awake, then I have some suggestions fro you.

The best thing about these changes? They are quick and easy. You won't need to wake up earlier nor do you have to start the day by employing your overused will power. You can complete all of them in fewer than 5 minutes.

YAWN

You already do this. But have you ever paid attention when you yawn? Or are you already reaching for your phone on your night stand or planning what you would do that day?

Try this when you yawn tomorrow. Don't sit up in bed. Don't start walking. Just enjoy how good if feels to have the big gulp of air. You're alone, so you don't have to worry about covering your mouth. Let the yawn take its time.

Indulge.

baby wearing a knitted hat, yawning

Photo by  marvelmozhko

Woman sitting in bed stretching her arms overhead

Photo by Michelle Leman 

STRETCH

Yawn's first cousin. If you observe small children and pets, beings who respond to their physical needs naturally, you'd notice that they always stretch before moving elsewhere.

I'm sure you stretch too. Do you know how you like to stretch? Arms thrown wide and head tilted back? With hands interlaced over your head? Sitting in bed? Standing? Accompanied with satisfied noises?

Take your time tomorrow morning. Do more than one stretch if you feel like it. Don't skim. Luxuriate in it.

BE THANKFUL FOR ONE THING

Gratitude can rewire your brain in the long run. Its immediate benefits are not too shabby either: it sets a positive tone for your day.

Have you ever started a morning by reading an email with a minor irritant or a news headline that makes you sad and your mood stays bad?

Take charge of your first conscious and coherent thought. Choose gratitude. Don't hard to find something deeply profound. Be thankful for the sleep you got. Your bed. You sweet snoring puppy. The hot water for your shower. The sourdough bread waiting for you in the kitchen.

A young woman sitting in front of a brick wall with her hands clasp together

Photo by Keira Burton

A woman whose face is not seen, holds a glass of water

Photo by Daria Shevtsova

DRINK WATER

Set out a glass of water on your bedside table the night before. Drink it before you get out of bed.

You'll find all sorts of benefits that come from drinking water first thing in the morning being touted, anything from fueling your brain to burning fat faster. While some of these claims are not exactly well-supported, the idea of drinking water is a good one if only because your body is usually dehydrated overnight and you need to replenish and keep yourself hydrated.

MOVE

Don't make this something difficult. Don't plan to do a full yoga flow or 30 push-ups if you have never done anything physical when you first get out of bed.

Stand up and turn your torso to the right and left a few times. Roll your shoulders. Swing your arms. Hug your knee to your chest one at a time. Do any free-style movements that feel good to your body.

This is not the time to work on challenges. This is a time to encourage your blood to flow more, to wake your muscles up, to find if there are areas in your body that need some TLC.

Woman standing with arms outstretched in a room furnished with tapestry on the wall, desk and lamp

Photo by Tim Samuel 

There you have it: stretch and yawn slowly, express gratitude for one simple thing, drink a glass or water, and move a little.

Try it. You will find the pull of the phone lessen over time. And you'll start your day off right.